#TBT - A decade of interactive kiosks

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#TBT

A Decade of Interactive Kiosks

Here’s a bit of nostalgia for you, I had an excerpt from an issue of AV News forwarded to me today from February 2007 relating to Interactive Kiosks and was asked for my take on it, and how things have lived up to the anticipation of such devices.

I suppose the first thing that comes to mind is that this was only 10 years ago … I say only, when it comes to technology, that has to be the equivalent of 10 generations according to Apple – who released the original iPhone just four months after the publication.

So, what does it say and look like? Well it’s opposite in all of its retro glory for you to take a look at if you so wish – I had a chuckle within the first few paragraphs so it’s well worth a read - how unimaginative we were.

We all knew that Interactive would become a staple of everyday life the second we got our hands on that first generation of smart phone. All that power in the palm of our hands in a sleek, cool, trend setting device. The internet at the drop of a hat, all of our music available from a few taps of that little screen, and we could also make calls to people – back in a time when people spoke to each other rather than rely on E-Mail and messaging apps as the primary for communication.

BUT….and this is a big but... The interactive kiosks mentioned in this article were the start of it all. The start of people interacting with machines on a daily basis, the start of people being able to effortlessly procure their own information, and the start of a revolution in service and experience.

I think the only thing that might be wrong, is how underestimated the volumes in which the interactive kiosk market would be adopted. Citing the article, Michael Burns, an analyst from Frost and Sullivan, ‘believed’ that it was a billion-dollar market worldwide. With an estimated ‘high’ growth rate of between 18 and 23%.

Fast forward a whole decade and here we are, and who would have thought that the CAGR would actually be more like 40%, with Research and Markets forecasting a $30.5bn market up to 2023.

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The above graph from Markets and Research, you can see that over the next 5 years, adoption is set to more than double as people become more and more confident in the technology and its uses. But on top of this, the way that kiosks are used will evolve also,

So, what’s to come with Interactive Kiosks over the coming years… they are only going to get smarter I’m afraid. Utilising our mobile devices which, 9 times out of 10, are somewhere on our person, the content will get more and more personalised. Using the phone to identify the user and bring the ‘people who were interested in this, were also interested in’ without having to even interact.

Utilising NFC, contactless authentication, will also become a major part of a kiosk’s design – Barclays Bank have recently rolled out to some of their branches ATM’s that you don’t even need to put your PIN into to withdraw cash.

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Utilising NFC, contactless authentication, will also become a major part of a kiosk’s design – Barclays Bank have recently rolled out to some of their branches ATM’s that you don’t even need to put your PIN into to withdraw cash.

In short, we seem to be a society that would rather interact with a screen than a human being. Our understanding of technology, in that it does exactly what you tell it, and very rarely makes mistakes makes it wholly understandable that this is a $30bn market.

We’re embracing technology, being in my mid-thirties I had to adapt to the technology as it came out, transforming life as I knew it. Generation Z however, they were born into it – the technology is normal and integrated into everyday life.

I personally think it’s exciting, and can’t wait to see the next evolution of the uses of interactive Kiosks and how they will only get smarter and smarter as the human need for information and service in a calculated and concise manner increases.

Dave Desalle -  National Business Development Manager at Focus 21 Visual Communications